Gaming

Top eSports players by 2019 tournament winnings

Today’s topic : Best 10 eSports teams. eSports are a huge money industry this days and you will amazed by the amounts esports players make.

As we ascend to the fifth spot on the list, we get greeted with the first Dota 2 player, Anathan “ana” Pham, who has finished the year with just under $3.15 million in his pockets. This is the second year in a row when we see ana among the top five earners, thanks to his achievements with OG Dota 2 roster, which repeated their success from last year and won their second successive International title. By winning TI9, OG earned $15,620,181, which split five-ways earned each player $3.124 million. Seeing him among the top five solely because he won one tournament, however, should not come off as a shock to anyone, considering that since 2011, a player who won The International was guaranteed to finish the year among top five earners, due to massive prize pools that have become a staple for the biggest Dota 2 tournament of the year. See more info on Top 10 eSports Players.

The National Association of Collegiate Esports (NACE) is a nonprofit membership association organized by and on behalf of its member institutions. What began on July 28, 2016 with just a handful of member schools has grown into organization that supports more than 94% of the 130+ schools with esports programs. NACE, which also supports more than 3,000 student athletes, offers more than $15 million in scholarships and aid. Funded by Fresno State President Joseph I. Castro and administered via Student Involvement, the program is housed within the Student Recreation Center, which has six console stations equipped with a 50″ Monitor, PS4, and Nintendo Switch. Competitive ladders will be offered in the coming months. Currently, the program is seeking a coach, area manager, production manager, and varsity players. Tryout information is to be announced. Visit Fresno State Student Affairs here to fill out a comment form to be notified when tryouts are set to begin.

“To me, putting that together and marrying them and having the students walk through the activities, it mirrors all the kids on campus. It gets them out of their dorm room. Because they’re playing this in their dorm rooms. Now they have to walk through the gym, walk through the campus, come upstairs and be integrated with all the sports,” Courtley-Todd said. The STU team currently has 10 members, with a practice space equipped for 17 players. The team will compete in League of Legends, and merit scholarships are available depending on the team member’s level of play. While STU does not have a formal game design program, the school does offer a BS in Computer Science.

The year 2019 has been a monumental one for the esports industry in many ways. We got to see the birth of new esports teams, the arrival of new esports titles in the competitive scene, but most importantly, 2019 had the most esports tournaments (4583) than any year before, which saw over US $214,000,000 in prize money handed out to players and organizations. With a lot of tournaments and massive amounts of money being handed out to the best teams and individuals, there were a few which stood out from the rest and earned themselves a spot among the top 10 best-paid esports teams of 2019. Here is the list of those teams based on information provided by esportsearnings.com and the teams themselves. See additional info on Top 10 eSports Teams.

Unikrn VO, an online esports betting platform, told the company that they are looking for new providers to help grow the casino at an advanced level. Swintt is the one who blends it and commits to improving the online casino. Unikrn offers esport-related games as well as SwinttGamify online tools. It will provide the viewer with an unforgettable and unprecedented experience. The agreement distributes more than 50 games from the Swintt catalogue including land-based classics such as’ Master of Books,” Heart of Earth,” Legendary,’ and’ Panda Warrior,’ which is due to release next year.

Due to the normalization of gaming and the internet (along with technological advances) the real surge of esports came in the noughties. It was then that we began seeing what we now know to be modern-day esports. As streaming platforms such as Twitch and YouTube took off, people began to show interest in not only playing videogames but watching them too. Popular tournaments now sell out stadiums and professional players (like Ninja) can earn millions between prize money, advertising and salaries. Source: www.onlineesports.com.